Robert Kuhn McGregor Ethan Lewis
Conundrums for the Long Week-End: England, Dorothy L. Sayers, and Lord Peter Wimsey
August 06, 2018 Comments.. 235
Conundrums for the Long Week End England Dorothy L Sayers and Lord Peter Wimsey Lord Peter Wimsey amateur detective man of fashion talented musician and wealthy intellectual is known to legions of readers His enduring presence and popularity is a tribute to his creator Doroth

  • Title: Conundrums for the Long Week-End: England, Dorothy L. Sayers, and Lord Peter Wimsey
  • Author: Robert Kuhn McGregor Ethan Lewis
  • ISBN: 9780873386654
  • Page: 163
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Lord Peter Wimsey amateur detective, man of fashion, talented musician, and wealthy intellectual is known to legions of readers His enduring presence and popularity is a tribute to his creator, Dorothy L Sayers, who brought Lord Peter to life during the long week end between the First and Second World Wars, as British aristocracy began to change, making way for aLord Peter Wimsey amateur detective, man of fashion, talented musician, and wealthy intellectual is known to legions of readers His enduring presence and popularity is a tribute to his creator, Dorothy L Sayers, who brought Lord Peter to life during the long week end between the First and Second World Wars, as British aristocracy began to change, making way for a modern world.In Conundrums for the Long Week End, Robert McGregor and Ethan Lewis explore how Sayers used her fictional hero to comment on, and come to terms with, the social upheaval of the time world wars, the crumbling of the privileged aristocracy, the rise of democracy, and the expanding struggle of women for equality A reflection of the age, Lord Peter s character changed tremendously, mirroring the developing subtleties of his creator s evolving worldview.Scholars of the Modern Age, fans of the mystery genre, and admirers of Sayer s fiction are sure to appreciate McGregor and Lewis s incisive examination of the literary, social, and historical context of this prized author s most popular work.

    • Ñ Conundrums for the Long Week-End: England, Dorothy L. Sayers, and Lord Peter Wimsey || Ç PDF Read by ✓ Robert Kuhn McGregor Ethan Lewis
      163 Robert Kuhn McGregor Ethan Lewis
    • thumbnail Title: Ñ Conundrums for the Long Week-End: England, Dorothy L. Sayers, and Lord Peter Wimsey || Ç PDF Read by ✓ Robert Kuhn McGregor Ethan Lewis
      Posted by:Robert Kuhn McGregor Ethan Lewis
      Published :2018-08-06T23:38:29+00:00

    1 Blog on “Conundrums for the Long Week-End: England, Dorothy L. Sayers, and Lord Peter Wimsey

    1. Kim says:

      I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. It's a scholarly yet very accessible work which traces the development of Dorothy L Sayers' detective hero Lord Peter Wimsey in the context of English social history of the 1920s and 1930s and Sayers' own life. The authors explore Sayers' use of Lord Peter to comment on issues such as the upheaval in English society caused by World War I, shifts in the class system and the expanding role of women. They relate the development of Lord Peter's character over [...]

    2. Bev says:

      Warning! If you have not yet read the Lord Peter Wimsey novels by Dorothy L. Sayers, then you will not want to read this book before doing so--unless you want the plots spoiled. Robert Kuhn McGregor and Ethan Lewis have no compunction about giving away virtually every clue and unmasking every villain in the novels and (most) short stories of the well-known mystery writer while expounding the Conundrums for the Long Week-End: England, Dorothy L. Sayers, and Lord Peter Wimsey. They assume (rightly [...]

    3. Dianna says:

      An excellent take on the world of Lord Peter Wimsey, one which I enjoyed vastly more than Dorothy L. Sayers' Wimsey and Interwar British Society, although they covered some of the same ground. It could be here the emphasis on the chronological aspects of Wimsey's career, and how it corresponded to Sayer's life at the time, rather than the topical analysis seen in Lewis' work. I really did find the biographical bits interesting - although I'm familiar with the a relatively detailed summary of Say [...]

    4. Gina Dalfonzo says:

      A valuable resource for the Sayers fan. The authors do a great job of placing Lord Peter Wimsey in his historical and cultural context, and offer helpful timelines that show how all the books fit together and how they were shaped by outside events. I've been reading the Wimsey books for 20 years and there was a ton of stuff here I didn't know or hadn't thought about (to my shame be it said!). I really appreciated it.The down side is that the authors are a little inclined to make sweeping literar [...]

    5. Heather says:

      I carried this book downstairs because I couldn't decide where to shelve it and I decided to put off making the decision by reading it.I still don't know where to shelve it and am puzzled by the book in general -- I can't imagine who would read it except Peter Wimsey fans; and if you're that much a fan, then you wouldn't need to read it. It's not bad. I just don't know what it gives us that we didn't already have.Conundrums for the Long Weekend is made up of three strands woven together -- Sayer [...]

    6. Anna Katharine says:

      As much as I love the Peter Wimsey series, I've long suspected that the temporal distance between my era and 1920's Britain diluted my understanding and appreciation of Sayers' work. This overview of society between the world wars helped immensely, and was an engaging and accessible read.

    7. Telesilla says:

      This tries to look at Sayers' life and the character arcs of Wimsey and Harriet in the context of the "long weekend"--the period between World War I and World War II. It succeeds but only on the most shallow level. I think the Lit Crit angle was the weakest part of the book. I didn't feel that I gained any insight into the characters or the books, and I'm not an academic. To be fair, I've read the Wimsey books over and over for the last 30+ years, so maybe I've just figured most of it out on my [...]

    8. Donna says:

      This is a very good book if you have read ALL of the Peter Wimsey stories. It sets Lord Peter in the context of his time (between the wars) and in the context of Dorothy L. Sayers life. It is NOT a good book to read if you have not read all of the Wimsey stories since virtually all of the plots and surprises are given away.But if you love these book as I do you, you will understand them more completely having read this volume. I'm ready to read them all over again.

    9. Genevieve says:

      Not a book that told me anything I didn't already know, being a passionate Wimsey fan and possessed of a deep interest in the inter-war period. But I find it a remarkably soothing book.

    10. Rose says:

      Nice lively criticism setting Lord Peter Wimsey into his times. Some very interesting points made about the varing quality of the novels in the series.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *