ElizabethFlock
The Heart Is a Shifting Sea: Love and Marriage in Mumbai
March 05, 2019 Comments.. 844
The Heart Is a Shifting Sea Love and Marriage in Mumbai Elizabeth Flock takes us on an intimate cruise on the shifting sea of the heart in the best book set in Bombay that I ve read in years Flock s total access to her characters and her highly sympathet

  • Title: The Heart Is a Shifting Sea: Love and Marriage in Mumbai
  • Author: ElizabethFlock
  • ISBN: 9780062456502
  • Page: 126
  • Format: ebook
  • Elizabeth Flock takes us on an intimate cruise on the shifting sea of the heart, in the best book set in Bombay that I ve read in years Flock s total access to her characters, and her highly sympathetic and nonjudgmental gaze, prove that love and literature know no borders Easily the most intimate account of India that I ve read, and of value to anybody that believes in Elizabeth Flock takes us on an intimate cruise on the shifting sea of the heart, in the best book set in Bombay that I ve read in years Flock s total access to her characters, and her highly sympathetic and nonjudgmental gaze, prove that love and literature know no borders Easily the most intimate account of India that I ve read, and of value to anybody that believes in love and marriage Suketu Mehta, author of Maximum City This remarkable debut is so deeply reported, elegantly written, and profoundly transporting that it reads like a novel you can t put down It s both a nuanced and intimate evocation of Indian culture, and a provocative and exciting meditation on marriage itself Katie Roiphe, author of The Violet HourIn the vein of Behind the Beautiful Forevers, an intimate, deeply reported and revelatory examination of love, marriage, and the state of modern India as witnessed through the lives of three very different couples in today s Mumbai.In twenty first century India, tradition is colliding with Western culture, a clash that touches the lives of everyday Indians from the wealthiest to the poorest While ethnicity, class, and religion are influencing the nation s development, so too are pop culture and technology an uneasy fusion whose impact is most evident in the institution of marriage.The Heart Is a Shifting Sea introduces three couples whose relationships illuminate these sweeping cultural shifts in dramatic ways Veer and Maya, a forward thinking professional couple whose union is tested by Maya s desire for independence Shahzad and Sabeena, whose desperation for a child becomes entwined with the changing face of Islam and Ashok and Parvati, whose arranged marriage, made possible by an online matchmaker, blossoms into true love Though these three middle class couples are at different stages in their lives and come from diverse religious backgrounds, their stories build on one another to present a layered, nuanced, and fascinating mosaic of the universal challenges, possibilities, and promise of matrimony in its present state.Elizabeth Flock has observed the evolving state of India from inside Mumbai, its largest metropolis She spent close to a decade getting to know these couples listening to their stories and living in their homes, where she was privy to countless moments of marital joy, inevitable frustration, dramatic upheaval, and whispered confessions and secrets The result is a phenomenal feat of reportage that is both an enthralling portrait of a nation in the midst of transition and an unforgettable look at the universal mysteries of love and marriage that connect us all.

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      Published :2019-03-05T08:54:08+00:00

    1 Blog on “The Heart Is a Shifting Sea: Love and Marriage in Mumbai

    1. Lance Richardson says:

      I loved this book. It's rare – and brilliant – to see a subject like marriage (and love, and heartache, and domestic disharmony) receive such a serious and considered journalistic treatment.

    2. Tony says:

      giveaway winnerThank you!

    3. Amy Morgan says:

      Thank you Edelweiss for my review copy of this book. The Heart Is A Shifting Sea follows 3 couples and their relationships throughout a period of over 10 years as Western culture begins colliding with Indian tradition. These couples embody how these cultural changes are affecting Indian culture and traditions in both the Hindu and Muslim religions. Maya and Veer married by choice but their relationship is often tested throughout the years by Veer's family, her need for independence and his love [...]

    4. Sarah Beth says:

      I received an uncorrected proof copy of this book from HarperCollins. This work of non-fiction follows the marriages of three couples in today's Mumbai. Told in a narrative, novelistic style, this work of journalism presents three examples of modern day marriage in India. Although all three couples and their circumstances differ, this book provides an interesting look at the state of love, marriage, class, and religion in Indian today. Veer and Maya marry for love but are tested by Veer's workah [...]

    5. Carol says:

      Thank you and Harperfor my advance reader copy.This nonfiction book follows the lives ofthree married couples in Indiaduring a time of great politicaland social change. Time setting isfrom 1983 to 2015.The reader is privy to the innermostthoughts and feelings of each of the husbands and wives. I was surprised at the openness and level of transparencyshown. Somehow I don't think most peoplewould reveal extramarital dalliancesand feelings of unrequited love sofreely! Definitely makes for veryinte [...]

    6. KarnagesMistress says:

      I received this book for free through Giveaways. It is an uncorrected proof.

    7. Shraddha Chakradhar says:

      I’m so sad to have finished this book—Flock does an excellent job of providing vignettes of the lives of the characters, and wish I could see how the rest of their lives play out. As a TamBrahm who is from Chennai but spends much of her visits to India in Mumbai, this book was like a homecoming. Such vivid descriptions of both cities, of the drama and expectations that come with Indian families—I felt like I was back home. The interspersed Hindi and Tamil were also great for nostalgia! I i [...]

    8. Alexis says:

      While living in India, American reporter Elizabeth Flock began following middle class Indian couples in Mumbai. She ultimately wound up with three that she followed long term--Marwari Hindus Maya and Veer, Muslims Shazad and Sabeena, and Tamil Brahimins Ashok and Parvati. None of the couples have had a smooth path: Maya and Veer eloped against the wishes of their parents, Shazad and Sabeena have struggled with infertility, and Ashok and Parvati agreed to an arranged marriage after failed relatio [...]

    9. Mythili says:

      The journalist Elizabeth Flock was in her early 20s when she moved to Mumbai. Though she was wary of overromanticizing India, she was immediately taken with what appeared to be an Indian attitude toward romance itself. “In Mumbai, people seemed to practice a showy, imaginative kind of love,” she writes in “The Heart Is a Shifting Sea.” She wondered if there was wisdom to this brand of passion: “When I arrived in Mumbai after my dad’s third divorce, the city seemed to hold some answer [...]

    10. Harvee says:

      Because the book is a combination of three separate and different stories, of three couples who don't know or interact with each other, it would have been easier for the reader if the novel had been divided into three sections instead of interspersing sections of the stories throughout. I found it hard to remember the previous couple after reading about couple number two and having to switch back to couple number one or forward to number three. I couldn't keep them straight that way.

    11. Suzanne says:

      This is a wonderful book that provides an intimate and nuanced depiction of relationships in modern day India. It is a great example of well-researched and well-written narrative non-fiction, which weaves in cultural and historical details of significance, providing insightful context for the challenges experienced by the three couples the author followed. I highly recommend this book.

    12. Katelyn says:

      DNF. Well written and researched, interesting account of the marriages of three Indian couples. Stopped after the first couple because their unfaithfulness and unwillingness to work on their marriage was depressing.

    13. Lisa Barbour says:

      I'm not a big fan of nonfiction, but I really liked this book. Great insight into marriage and society in India.

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