Kristen Welch Meredith Mitchell
Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World: How One Family Learned That Saying No Can Lead to Life's Biggest Yes
August 12, 2018 Comments.. 631
Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World How One Family Learned That Saying No Can Lead to Life s Biggest Yes But everyone else has it If you loved me you d get it for me When you hear these comments from your kids it can be tough not to cave You love your children don t you want them to be happy and to fit

  • Title: Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World: How One Family Learned That Saying No Can Lead to Life's Biggest Yes
  • Author: Kristen Welch Meredith Mitchell
  • ISBN: 9781494598860
  • Page: 119
  • Format: Audiobook
  • But everyone else has it If you loved me, you d get it for me When you hear these comments from your kids, it can be tough not to cave You love your children don t you want them to be happy and to fit in Kristen Welch knows firsthand it s not that easy In fact, she s found out that when you say yes too often, it s not only hard on your peace of mind and your walle But everyone else has it If you loved me, you d get it for me When you hear these comments from your kids, it can be tough not to cave You love your children don t you want them to be happy and to fit in Kristen Welch knows firsthand it s not that easy In fact, she s found out that when you say yes too often, it s not only hard on your peace of mind and your wallet it actually puts your kids at long term risk In Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World, Kristen shares the ups and downs in her own family s journey of discovering why it s healthiest not to give their kids everything Teaching them the difference between want and need is the first step in the right direction With many practical tips and anecdotes, she shares how to help kids become hardworking, fulfilled, and successful adults.It s never too late to raise grateful kids Get ready to cultivate a spirit of genuine appreciation in your family and create a home in which your kids don t just say but mean thank you for everything they have.

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      Posted by:Kristen Welch Meredith Mitchell
      Published :2018-08-12T18:00:20+00:00

    1 Blog on “Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World: How One Family Learned That Saying No Can Lead to Life's Biggest Yes

    1. Jennifer says:

      Most every parent wants the best for his or her child. But what happens when this concept is taken too far, and instead of improving their children's lives, parents end up creating entitled tyrants? This is the concept Kristen Welch explores in her new book, Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World. Welch is the writer of the popular blog, We Are THAT Family. In addition to being a good writer, she's honest, funny, approachable and real. Through personal stories, Welch shares her experience of [...]

    2. Michele Morin says:

      Grateful Parents: Grateful KidsFinally, about ten years ago, the light began to dawn, and you can’t imagine how disappointed I was. I realized that parenting is not a cause and effect proposition. It’s not a vending machine in which I insert my actions (seizing teachable moments, training in character, consistency in discipline) and then am rewarded by equal and corresponding reactions (obedience, respect, good behavior).I’m a slow learner, so this was earth-shattering for me, but . . .Hav [...]

    3. Lindsay says:

      I couldn't really relate to a lot of the content of this book because the authors children attend public school and have surprisingly more struggles with entitlement then my own home educated children, but it definitely got me prayerfully thinking about how to cultivate more of a heart of contentment and thankfulness in my children. It was quick and enjoyable to read.

    4. Laura says:

      A must-read for today's Christian parent! I knew this book was going to be good from the very first chapter, because it called me to task on things that I needed to change. Me - the parent. Not just my kids! And these are hard things to do because so much of what goes into raising grateful children flies in the face of what our society expects us to do. The tasks aren't easy, but the stakes couldn't be any higher. If you want to start down the path toward raising grateful, empowered, generous an [...]

    5. Karen says:

      This is a great book! It applies to kids of all ages and it is backed up with biblical principles.

    6. Scott Kennedy says:

      I leapfrogged into this book from another book that mentioned it. I was captured by the title. There were some really helpful practical ideas in this book. Welch includes a section at the end of each chapter where she summarises key ideas for parents, toddlers, young children and teens. In these sections there are nuggets of gold. For instance, as a family, Welch recommends a gratitude journal or box, where family members enter what they are grateful for. These can then be pulled out at a later [...]

    7. Jill says:

      What can I say? I love this book. I love it's cover - how it looks. I love the format and how it feels in my hands. I love the mix of personal stories and practical tips. Most of all, I love the message."We live in a culture that is obsessed with the right to have what we want, whether we've earned it or not." If you believe in the concept of grace, then hopefully you understand that grace is two-fold. Grace is, first of all, getting what you don't deserve, and secondly, grace is not getting wha [...]

    8. Anna says:

      Although I have no children and, sadly, most likely never will, I found this a valuable look into what entitlement and gratitude means with some good ideas about how to achieve a more grateful life. Welch is strongly Christian and as someone coming from a different branch of Christianity some of her language took a little extra work to understand, so this may not be a great fit for someone from another faith tradition.

    9. Katie M.Reid says:

      This is a must-read for every parent. We have seen many entitled behavior in our kids and this book was a God-send—full of practical advice, grace-based methods, and loving support. Say no to the status quo and yes to raising grateful kids. I'm so thankful that there is a resource like this out there to help me navigate swimming upstream in our self-centered, me-driven culture.

    10. Myla says:

      I could love or hate this book on any given day could inspire or depress, motivate or irritate all depending upon my attitude.

    11. Shorel Kleinert says:

      In the car ride home from Kunming yesterday, our kids started complaining about which movie to watch first. Or a couple weeks ago, our eldest started asking when he was going to get an iPad to play games like all his other friends.Entitlement is a big issue in nearly every family nowadays. I appreciate the author taking time to explain that she is not perfect, but here are many practical steps she took with her family to turn "entitled" kids into grateful kids.This book is gold! I'll leave you w [...]

    12. Elaine says:

      Great Christian parenting book! We are constantly trying to fight the 'entitlement' attitude in our kids, this book hits the nail on the head on the trends that have fed this attitude-an abundance of material goods, "participation" trophies, child-centered homes, trying to fit in with people, constantly "rescuing" our kids from bad consequencesShe gives much practical advice and ideas, divided up by age group, not just on creating an atmosphere of gratitude, but also other parenting issues like [...]

    13. Renee says:

      DNF. I hardly ever review a book I could not finish. The author spoke at my MOPS group about her nonprofit so this book intrigued me. We all want grateful kids. I also want my child to be loving and caring and open minded to ALL people. I was enjoying the book and like the end of the chapters where there are practical examples/prompts to do for each age level but in chapter 2 she began to assert her religion on views and was not very loving to all of God's children. Came across judgmental and pr [...]

    14. Connie says:

      It mostly seems like this is the author’s personal confessional about how she and her family are not perfect. This definitely has some good ideas, but I feel like I’m in a completely different place than the author and her family. I think this book would probably be best for people who, like the author, send their kids to public school. When one decides to home school, this topic gets a slightly different perspective and focus. There is definitely some applicability, but then there are those [...]

    15. Angela Stricklin says:

      You know how you tell your kid no and she texts back "Fine".No? Just me? Raising Grateful Kids by Kristen Welch of We are THAT family is not just a parenting book on how to raise grateful kids's an I'm here in the trenches with you and isn't life hard sometimes and where did my kids learn to be so entitled because I'm not entitled and honey, when are you going to buy me a new car? kind of book.Kristen shares her still in progress parenting journey in a unique way that will make you laugh, cry, n [...]

    16. Holly Splawn says:

      I liked the message of this book. I've been a big fan of Kristen Welch for years, following her blog and her non-profit work in Kenya, Mercy House. Also my husband and I are members of the Mercy House Global Fair-Trade-Friday subscription club, and we love the mission and ministry of this work. This book was written for Christians in first-world countries who are dealing with entitlement and wanting to bring this area of their family life under control. It would be hard to apply in other context [...]

    17. Jennifer says:

      This title caught my eye while browsing the "always available" audio book section of my online library. I thought it was more of a self-help book and was surprised to find it a very Christian book. Other than the scriptures, I don't usually read religious books but this one was very good. It was a little strange to hear scriptures quoted from various translations, but it was interesting. I listened to this right after "The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up" so I will try to take some of this boo [...]

    18. Chris"Gunner" McGrath says:

      This is not really a how-to book, it's more of the story of one family that is trying to figure things out. In a way, that's all we can really ask for these days. After all, anyone old enough to have raised a family and seen the results of their efforts as adults did so in a different world than we have today. Many aspects of our current culture throw wrenches in any plan made by parents with enough experience to speak with authority. So I'm appreciative of a book written by someone raising kids [...]

    19. Toni says:

      This is a book I can see myself reading a few times. It had great advice in every chapter! The advice comes from a Christian Mom raising three kids. I loved how most all of her advice was related to religion. I also loved how she explained what worked for her, but also explained that some may not agree with her choices, or may find something that better suits them and their family. And the cell phone contract she gave her kids brilliant! I really enjoyed this one.1/14/18 I just listened to this [...]

    20. Renee says:

      Here are some major points- we want more then we need or deserve. - parents have a duty to teach gratitude by example, by being consistent in not encouraging entitlement - less is more- parents need to teach kids , ownership, value of money and hard work, to be responsible and able to manage consequences, teach to have the right perspective and help them see the benefits of delayed gratification. I would recommend this book to parents who are looking to live a counter-cultural life!

    21. Jolanthe says:

      Absolutely 100% recommend you add this book to your reading list. So many dog-eared pages. Much to go over with my hubby. Raising kids in today's 'gimme' world is tough and requires spiritual insight to balance it out. This book is full of encouragement, resources, and inspiration for raising kids that are servants, givers, and followers of Jesus.

    22. Malea Schmitt says:

      I felt like I needed to take notes when I read this book. So many great tips of how to help our kids grow up grateful. She is a bit preachy in terms of her faith and lifestyle, but I think she echoes my beliefs and experiences closely enough.

    23. Allie says:

      Loved, loved, loved this book! Kristen is easy to read, understand and follow! She doesn't preach at me or make me feel like I have four more things to add to my to do list. This book is filled with plenty of grace and tangible changes to add to your home and parenting practices. Highly recommend!

    24. Mindee Berkman says:

      This ibis purpose-driven parentingI'm struggling with whether I am challenged or inspired more by this book. This is Kristen's best book yet. I love her humble approach- she never claims to be an expert, quite the opposite actually but she is closer than she thinks she is

    25. Sean says:

      Some good tips even for us non believers. A key takeaway is that community service, chores with a salary (not allowance), consistent discipline help mold the young minds to work hard and appreciate what they have. Just skip chapter 7 and any paragraph that starts with "God wants "

    26. Candy Dalton says:

      Oh my. Powerful. One of the most convicting books I have ever read. Not just about my kids but about my ungratefulness.

    27. Melissa says:

      This book was not what I expected. I did not get a lot of information out of it. It was very churchy and I could not relate to their children.

    28. Heather says:

      I love my kids and I want to give them the childhood I had, plus some. I want to make their days sparkle with wonder and their holidays, especially, magical. I want them to wake up on Christmas morning to a twinkling Christmas tree surrounded by pretty packages filled with the things they've dreamed of all year long. But on top of that, I want to raise them to have a grateful heart that recognizes and appreciates a gift for the extra-ordinary thing that it is. I want them to peel off the wrappin [...]

    29. Amanda says:

      This was an excellent book. I read the author's blog, so I was familiar with her writing style already (which I like obviously). This book has some very practical, useful advice for raising children in today's world, and even if you don't agree completely with everything she does, the principles are solid. And the author even states that this is what works for her family and does not have a condemning tone about others who may do something different. It might sound strange, but while reading thi [...]

    30. Lindsey says:

      This was a great book and very thought-provoking. It was insightful for her to start the examination of the parent (are you grateful?) and I found that convicting. It was good to work through this slowly with some self-examination. But the best part of this book was her discussion of how Christians, and that includes our children if they are Christian, WILL BE different from the world around them. How does this affect the choices we make as our children try to fit in with the culture around them [...]

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