Kären E. Wigen
The Making of a Japanese Periphery, 1750-1920
June 06, 2019 Comments.. 731
The Making of a Japanese Periphery Contending that Japan s industrial and imperial revolutions were also geographical revolutions K ren Wigen s interdisciplinary study analyzes the changing spatial order of the countryside in early mo

  • Title: The Making of a Japanese Periphery, 1750-1920
  • Author: Kären E. Wigen
  • ISBN: 9780520084209
  • Page: 365
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Contending that Japan s industrial and imperial revolutions were also geographical revolutions, K ren Wigen s interdisciplinary study analyzes the changing spatial order of the countryside in early modern Japan Her focus, the Ina Valley, served as a gateway to the mountainous interior of central Japan Using methods drawn from historical geography and economic developmentContending that Japan s industrial and imperial revolutions were also geographical revolutions, K ren Wigen s interdisciplinary study analyzes the changing spatial order of the countryside in early modern Japan Her focus, the Ina Valley, served as a gateway to the mountainous interior of central Japan Using methods drawn from historical geography and economic development, Wigen maps the valley s changes from a region of small settlements linked in an autonomous economic zone, to its transformation into a peripheral part of the global silk trade, dependent on the state Yet the processes that brought these changes industrial growth and political centralization were crucial to Japan s rise to imperial power Wigen s elucidation of this makes her book compelling reading for a broad audience.

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      365 Kären E. Wigen
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      Posted by:Kären E. Wigen
      Published :2019-06-06T00:57:52+00:00

    1 Blog on “The Making of a Japanese Periphery, 1750-1920

    1. Chelsea Szendi says:

      Reading this book inspires me to try to think more spatially. It strikes me as really smart to evaluate how peripheries emerged in modern Japan.

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