Joel R. Primack Nancy Ellen Abrams
The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos
August 20, 2018 Comments.. 919
The View from the Center of the Universe Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos A world renowned astrophysicist and a science philosopher present a new scientifically supported understanding of the universe one that will forever change our personal relationship with the cosmos

  • Title: The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos
  • Author: Joel R. Primack Nancy Ellen Abrams
  • ISBN: 9781594489143
  • Page: 136
  • Format: Hardcover
  • A world renowned astrophysicist and a science philosopher present a new, scientifically supported understanding of the universe, one that will forever change our personal relationship with the cosmos For four hundred years, since early scientists discovered that the universe did not revolve around the earth, people have felt cut off adrift in a meaningless cosmos That iA world renowned astrophysicist and a science philosopher present a new, scientifically supported understanding of the universe, one that will forever change our personal relationship with the cosmos For four hundred years, since early scientists discovered that the universe did not revolve around the earth, people have felt cut off adrift in a meaningless cosmos That is about to change In their groundbreaking new book, The View from the Center of the Universe, Joel R Primack, Ph.D one of the world s leading cosmologists, and Nancy Ellen Abrams, a philosopher and writer, use recent advances in astronomy,physics, and cosmology to frame a compelling new theory of how to understand the universe and our role in it While most of us think of the universe as empty space peppered with stars separated by vast distances, the truth, the authors argue, is far richer and meaningful For the first time in history, we know that the universe is coherent and spiritually significant than anyone ever imagined and that our place in it is actually central to the expanding universe in important ways According to Primack and Abrams, this new cosmology clarifies how the universe operates, what it s made of, how it may have originated, and how it is evolving Even surprising, these startling ideas spring from both cutting edge science and the metaphors of ancient symbols The result is a very human book that satisfies our fundamental need for order and meaning in our world and in our lives.

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      Posted by:Joel R. Primack Nancy Ellen Abrams
      Published :2018-08-20T04:12:18+00:00

    1 Blog on “The View from the Center of the Universe: Discovering Our Extraordinary Place in the Cosmos

    1. Steven Coberly says:

      Sigh. I SO wanted to like this book. I teach a science course in Cosmology. Along with teaching the science of the standard (big bang) model of cosmology, one of the themes I tease out is how one's story of cosmology affects their worldview. SO I was excited to read a book written by an actual scientist that explicitly tackled that idea. But I was so disappointed. As for the science, it's all accurate, of course, but presented in a cursory and rehashed way. So if you are interested in learning a [...]

    2. Nick Black says:

      there are roughly 40,000 books which cover this material better, with less nonsense, fewer insipid metaphors, and no appeals to assumed judeo-christian sympathies.

    3. J.Charles says:

      WellI didn't like it, I liked it, I didn't like it. This book was in three distinct sections; the first and third didn't interest me. The middle section is the reason I read this book in the first place - for the astronomy, for the physicse cool stuff! I felt the intro and conclusion were mind-numbingly boring and redundant. It seems the author(s) took four paragraphs to get one paragraph of substance on paper. However the problems I had with it were perhaps, as I admit, due to my particular int [...]

    4. Lisa says:

      I absolutely love this book. Clear and concise about a subject that is often too big (or small) for the mind to conceive.

    5. John says:

      Very readable astronomy/cosmology. Among other things, I learned you can drop a mouse down a 1000-foot mine shaft and if the floor is soft enough it'll walk away.

    6. Tyler Wanden says:

      This book had been sitting on my shelf for years. Years and years. I think I had persuaded my mom to buy it for me one day at Barnes and Noble when I was feeling particularly adventurous with my literary pursuits, and as any book buying addict knows, it’s absolute FOLLY to simply buy a book and cast it aside. It’s because no matter how many times you tell yourself that you’ll forget about it, it somehow finds a way into the forefront of your conscious. I have a pile of books, nay, two or t [...]

    7. Matt says:

      This book left me completely baffled as to how I should feel about it. The explanations of dense topics like dark matter and neutrinos were accessible and comprehensive. At some points, there were even real instances of profundity which made me want to root for the book. Unfortunately, those were undermined by the frequent interpolation of tenuous "arguments" for anthropocentrism. Alas, these speculations are the whole foundation of the book.While the authors show great knowledge in cosmological [...]

    8. Kasandra says:

      Largely, I think this was a waste of paper -- could have been written with a third of the pages and still said the same things. I started out enthusiastically, hoping to learn more about cosmology -- and then often fell asleep while reading this book because the scientific explanations were so hard to follow, and dry, and just. boooooring. This from someone who aced and enjoyed college astronomy! Anyway, I kept slogging through it, and did enjoy discussions of past cultures' cosmology myths, but [...]

    9. Matt Kenson says:

      A book I was genuinely sorry to see finish. I never read more than 20 or so pages in a sitting, but each pause would be thought provoking. The authors are the real deal and have a significant capacity to explain HUGE ideas. Other reviews I have read warned against the final chapters. If reading is ultimately an act of surrendering to the author's vision, I have to congratulate the authors for prosecuting their argument so well, using a quite detailed explanation of the unique circumstances that [...]

    10. Willa says:

      After reading this book, you'll never look at the Cosmos or yourself in the same way. It fundamentally changed my awareness of the entire Cosmos as well as my place in it as a human being. This is a book of the future - you have to be very open to really let in the picture. It does away with the linear thinking that has been at the basis of our scientific worldview.It also is a very clearly explained history of cosmology which I loved - so many things about science and astronomy that I have neve [...]

    11. Ata A says:

      The book was legit. The best chapter was Human Is a Big Identity. The work is littered with profound and meaningful quotes from poets authors scientists etc, like from Dh Lawrence "Some of the great images of the apocalypse nice us to strange depths, and to a strange wild fluttering of freedom: of true freedom, really, an escape to somewhere, not an escape to nowhere. An escape from the tight little cage of our universe; tight, in spite of all the astronomist's vast and unthinkable stretches of [...]

    12. Sally says:

      Well-intensioned attempt to use the images and archetypal stories from world mythology to express current scientific concepts in a way accessable to ordinary people, and so construct a modern scientific mythology that impacted people's consciousness the way older religion/mythology did. However, I found it too wedded to current scientific models as "true" rather than as provisional theories (which to me is the beauty and truth of science). Give me my science "straight," not as a mythologized wor [...]

    13. Karen Lyons says:

      This book was a surprise. I was blown away by the first two parts; thoughtful and very interesting explanation of the current scientific thoughts on the universe and how it all started. Deep, you had to pause frequently to absorb the information, but still it read like a great sci-fi story. The third section seemed to be written by a totally different author? Supposedly it was about how humans fit into the story of the universe. It just doesn't work and I wish I had totally skipped this section. [...]

    14. Stuart says:

      I've read a number of science and philosophy books and this is one of the very few that dares to tie the two together. It can get a little new-agey but always remains science-based and never wanders into the unsubstantiated. I preferred their 2nd book "The New Universe and the Human Future" as it had links to videos on their website, better iconography and writing to explain their cosmology, but this book is worth reading to. Highly recommended.

    15. Arthur dos Santos says:

      I have chosen to read this book because it seemed to me that this text was intended to balance ideas from science and religion, but instead this book gives us an alternate point of view of the modern cosmology. The book starts very well, with stories of ancient cosmology, and it evolves nicely to modern cosmology, but it gets somehow boring at the end, when the authors tried to make a point by creating a alternative phylosophy to see the future of the human kind and the universe.

    16. Laura Englehart says:

      I quit reading this book about 200 pages into it, and I only made it that far because I skipped the first 50 or so. Most of the time I spent reading, I asked myself, "What is the point of this fact, paragraph, tangent, CHAPTER, BOOK!" Another reviewer summed it up better than I in calling it "largely a waste of paper." I wish I would have read that BEFORE I started reading. Maybe I didn't give it much of a chance, but if I'm not interested 200 pages in, I'm not going to keep reading.

    17. University of Chicago Magazine says:

      Nancy Abrams, AB'69CoauthorFrom the coauthor: "After centuries of being told we are insignificant motes in a vast universe, the new cosmology based on dark matter and dark energy reveals that we are actually central to the principles that underlie our universe, letting us humans for the first time have a meaningful place in the scientific universe."

    18. Kit says:

      I was a little bogged down and intimidated with all the astrophysics at the beginning, but this is one of those books that changed my view of the world and my role within it. It was excellent, even though there were sections I couldn't sort out in a meaningful way. I plan to reread this at some point.

    19. Paul L'Herrou says:

      As a physisist writing about the evolving universe and particle physics, he is excellent, makes it very understandable. And, writing about the mythology which our knowledge has outgrown, they are inciteful; but, when they try to develop a modern mythology/cosmology for our time, it just doesn't cut it.

    20. Meaghan McQuade says:

      The book cover doesn't lie when is says that everyone should read this book. No matter where you are in life, or what your cosmological lens is, you can certainly appreciate where this booking is coming from. It's well written and packs a serious intellectual punch!

    21. C. says:

      I really like this book. The authors pull together arguments from across history and disciplines. It is helpful that the book is written by a husband and wife team as having both perspectives helps to explain some of the points more clearly.

    22. Mathieu Thogerson says:

      One of the few books I will ever give five stars to. Beautifully written and overall elegant; a great introduction to astronomy as well as an excellent window on what it means to be human in the universe--without the use of a "God".

    23. Liz says:

      Mattering

    24. Ian Richter says:

      Mostly just a waste of paper.

    25. Susan Roden says:

      I'm half way through and it is getting much more interesting.A philosophy book as much as a physics book, but both are so intertwined

    26. Regina says:

      Nice overview of historical backround and ideas. Good things here and there, but I think book could be half the size if authors didn't beat around the bush too much and said what needed to be said.

    27. Jen says:

      An excellent read from Jen Lancaster. I didn't like her Last book as much, but she seems to have made a comeback (in my eyes) with My Fair Lazy.

    28. yamiyoghurt says:

      Interesting ideas, but the writing could have been better.

    29. David Gross says:

      Too much blah-blah-blah in between the interesting bits. I didn't finish it.

    30. Isabel says:

      I really wanted to be able to read this, perhaps I just chose the wrong timehol library 13 May 2015

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